CHIVALRY & WISDOM

Hi, I'm Alberto, I am one of thousands of Venezuelans self-exiled. this blog is for sharing my biggest passions: Horses and Swords as well as related stuff.
So, what you will find here is mostly: that as well as art, bullfights, history, Avatar (the original one), Harry Potter, Studio Ghibli, Game of Thrones, landscapes, nature, menswear...
Feel free of asking anything, I speak Spanish, English, Italian and learning French.
Of course most of what you see or listen here is not mine.
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barebackandbarefoot:

This cutie ♡

spellthief:

httyd2 + end credits

marthajefferson:

     “[King Henry VII kept a tight rein on his rambunctious son, for he knew that Henry had no kingly qualities yet] Previously, the King had never taken his son on progress, in order ‘not to disrupt his studies’. Now, he ‘was so wise, and attentive to everything regarding his son’s upbringing’: ‘nothing escapes his attention’. (…) For the first thirteen years of Prince Henry’s life, he had barely inhabited his father’s world. Suddenly, they had been thrown vividly, closely together; Henry, hawklike, watching over his son’s security and development.
     But it was Henry’s demonstrative affection for his son that attracted most attention. Travelling with the court, the Spanish ambassador Ferdinand Duque - sent to keep an eye on the activities of the Anglophile Rodrigo de Puebla - remarked warmly of the king’s parenting skills in a letter to King Ferdinand. ‘It is quite wonderful’, he wrote, ‘how much the king likes the prince of Wales’ - and with good reason, for the prince ‘deserves all love.’ ‘Certainly’, he commented approvingly, ‘there could be no better school in the world than the society of such a father as Henry VII.’
     Ferdinand Duque had no reason to disbelieve the evidence of his own eyes, and indeed, Henry’s delight in the prince was entirely consistent with his behaviour on the rare occasions that the pair had previously been seen together. The king did love his son - who was, after all, the embodiment of everything he had fought for over the previous quarter century. Besides which, the boy probably reminded Henry of Elizabeth.”

The Winter King: The Dawn of Tudor England, by Thomas Penn